Posted in Music

The evolution of music in my class

Evolution of music in my class

I love using music in class.  Every time, I think about the value of using music in class, I run into students who recall listening to music in my class and talk about their favorite song.  Or one of my students tell me that they have added a song to their playlist.  My students really do love listening to music.  Throughout the year, I have been playing with how I use music and have blogged about it periodically.  Now, I am putting them all together for this post because I finally feel like I have a direction on what I am doing with music.  While I keep the cloze activity while my students listen to the song, I have been evolving my post and pre-listening songs.

As I wrote before, I really like using some of the activities that Elizabeth Dentlinger shared for her songs of the week.  Each song can be thought of as an interpretive listening activity.  However, how can this be identified with songs?  With interpretive listening activities for songs, I like to include:

  • key word identification
  • main idea identification with supporting details
  • inference of lines (this is easiest to do with songs because they use more poetic language)
  • any cultural points

In addition to doing some post-work, I have also started to add more input before the song.  For example with my favorite song Yo te esperaré, I created this PearDeck.  My students and I love PearDeck because we can all work at the same time, and students can also see each other’s work on the projector.  Plus everyone can respond at the same time to the same question.  I can also click on a student’s answer to highlight it.  If you do not use PearDeck, you could easily have students answer these same questions/drawings on a whiteboard.

To start deciding on the pre-song activities, I describe the meaning and background of the song.  As the teacher, you can start to think about the message of the song.  For example, this song is about a fight between a couple and how the boy will continue to wait for the girl to come back.  This started my structure of the story.  You can highlight any parts that you are going to put in the cloze worksheet in your story to review ahead of time.  For this song, I included “si te vas no vuelves-” if you leave do not come back because that is a big line in the song, and it is easily understood by many of my students.  Be sure to focus and recycle any other parts of the song that you used before in class.  For example, my students still struggle on the differences with ser and estar.  I try to always highlight location and feelings with estar when I do these songs.  After we complete the pre-story, we listen to the song and watch the video.  I have also stopped the song to talk about different aspects of the song- or we just watch the video.

Then post song, I love having students act out parts of the song and caption this in Spanish.  We did this with Te Veo, and students wrote a caption in Seesaw.  This helps them summarize the video and recreate it.  It also allows them to provide some output after the input of the story and the song.  How do you like to engage students with music in class?

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