Olympics article scavenger hunt

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Another “event” will be a scavenger hunt for cognates.  As a warm-up, students will search the following articles for cognates- new words that they did NOT know prior to reading these articles.  I want students to be able to recognize new words and not always rely on me.  I will give the students about five minutes with their partner to find as many cognates as possible.  In the end, the team which has longest list of cognates will win a gold medal and points for their team.  Here are the articles that I am going to use:

A Twitter account

An article about the delegates from Spain

An article about the first person from Paraguay to compete in the Olympics

An article about the 12 new Olympic sports

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4 thoughts on “Olympics article scavenger hunt

  1. This is a great idea. One thing that discourages me, though, is when there are cognates for English words that my students don’t even know. For example, my seniors didn’t know disdain (desdén) or even convent (convento) when we did a reading. Have you found that your students don’t have as much English vocabulary to work with as you’d expect?

    • I think that this happens from time to time. However, I think it is important to expose my students to cognates regardless. You can use it as an opportunity to teach them the word in English as well. Many times, I would know a Spanish word and learn that it was a cognate in English. I was then able to remember both words better.

  2. I love this idea, and I love your blog! I will definitely be back for more inspiration; I teach K-8 and my upper grades are always the ones that need spicing up.

    I have encountered the same thing that Laura has – for example, I use “extrovertido” as a describing adjective because it is an easy cognate, and I end up teaching “extroverted” in English every time. I always just chalk this up as another way foreign language enriches first language proficiency.

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